Wednesday Seminar

today is Monday, November 20th, 2017

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler

“No Seminar - Thanksgiving Break”

    iCal icon


Wednesday, November 29th, 2017, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“Modern human origins: a view from North Africa”

      – by Dr. Teresa Steele, Department of Anthropology, UC Davis

Human fossils and genetics have shown that modern humans evolved in Africa during the Middle and Late Pleistocene, and then spread from there to populate the globe. Much of what is known about human behavioral evolution during this critical time comes from South Africa, and to a lesser extent eastern Africa. However, “Africa” is a big place, and it is important to examine regional patterns for consistency and diversity. In the past two decades research in northwestern Africa has expanded considerably, allowing us to reconstruct a fuller view of recent human evolution in Africa. In this talk I will discuss these new developments and how they are contributing to our understanding of human evolution in Africa, preceding the out of Africa demographic expansion. In particular, I will discuss the new finds from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco (Middle Pleistocene) and from Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco (Late Pleistocene), placing them in the context of what we know about modern human origins.

    iCal icon


Wednesday, December 6th, 2017, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“Monitoring and modeling post-wildfire debris-flow dynamics”

      – by Dr. Jason Kean, USGS

Debris flows often occur in burned steeplands throughout the western U.S. The size and destructive potential of debris flows presents a major hazard that can last several years after the fire. Fire-related debris-flow erosion can also be an important control on long-term rates of channel incision into bedrock, especially in landscapes with high fire frequency like much of California. I will present an overview of USGS research on post-fire debris-flow processes that are relevant to assessing hazards and understanding long-term geomorphic change. A key part of this research involves establishing monitoring sites in recently burned areas to “catch” debris flows in action. Monitoring includes use of video cameras, geophones, and laser distance meters to quantify flow depth and velocity; rainfall and soil moisture observations to capture triggering conditions; and high resolution measurements of topographic change to document hillslope and channel erosion. I will present highlights of recorded debris-flow events from California and Colorado. I will also describe how we use this data to develop and test (1) physically based models of debris-flow initiation and mobility and (2) more simple empirical models designed for rapid hazard assessment and defining rainfall thresholds for early warning.

    iCal icon


Wednesday, December 13th, 2017, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“No Seminar - AGU Fall Meeting”

    iCal icon


Wednesday, January 10th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Devin McPhillips, USGS

    iCal icon


Wednesday, January 17th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Kim Blisniuk, Geology Department, San Jose State University

    iCal icon


Wednesday, January 24th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Kenneth Creager, Earth and Space Sciences Department, University of Washington

    iCal icon


Wednesday, January 31st, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum meets the North Atlantic Igneous Province: Coincidence or global environmental conspiracy?”

      – by Dr. Andy Ridgwell, Department of Earth Sciences, UC Riverside

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma), with its multiple lines of
attendant evidence for massive greenhouse gas release and global-scale warming, is
regarded as a highly plausible future analogue. However, because the onset of the PETM
likely took place at a rate at least one, if not two, orders of magnitude slower than current
century-scale anthropogenic warming, it is uncertain what we can learn e.g. re. biotic
sensitivities, except perhaps to place a lower limit on potential future disruption. Instead,
focus has often been on what the PETM might reveal regarding the sensitivity of surficial,
reduced carbon stores (e.g. vegetation and soil carbon, permafrost, marine hydrates) to
warming, and hence the strength of positive feedbacks between atmospheric CO2 and
climate change. Indeed, almost all explanations to date for the PETM have relied either
solely, or dominantly, on one or more of these carbon sources and feedbacks. Yet one of the
largest igneous provinces (the North Atlantic Igneous Province — ‘NAIP’) recorded in the
geological record was being emplaced exactly at this time and its role to date, almost entirely,
overlooked.
Here I present a revised view of the PETM as one predominantly the product of massive
volcanism, making it rather unexpectedly more like the end Permian in character. Feedbacks
with climate and involving reservoirs of reduced organic carbon likely only play a more minor
role, reducing the event’s future relevance. I come to these conclusions on the basis of new
paired records of boron and carbon isotope changes, assimilating these data in an Earth
system model to reconstruct the unfolding carbon cycle dynamics across the event. Model
results indicate >10,000 PgC with an average isotopically heavier than -17‰ is required to
account for the observations, leading to the identification of volcanism associated with the
NAIP as the main driver of the PETM.

    iCal icon


Wednesday, February 7th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Geerat Vermeij

    iCal icon


Wednesday, February 21st, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Rob Campbell

    iCal icon


Wednesday, February 28th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Aodhan Butler

    iCal icon


Wednesday, March 7th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Mitch Mihalynuk

    iCal icon


Wednesday, March 14th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Zach Sharp

    iCal icon


Wednesday, April 25th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Nita Sahai

    iCal icon


Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Caroline Strömberg, Department of Biology, University of Washington

    iCal icon


Wednesday, May 9th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Susannah Dorfman, COMPRES Distinguished Lecturer, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University

    iCal icon


Wednesday, May 16th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Ravi Kanda

    iCal icon


Wednesday, May 30th, 2018, Wednesday Seminar

4:10 PM, 55 Roessler
Tea and cookies at 3:45 in the aviary - (2110 EPS)

“TBA”

      – by Dr. Bradley Hacker

    iCal icon


  Return to the main calendar page.