Video & Audio

Video

PBS NewsHour

Precarious Oroville Dam highlights challenges of California water management

February 13, 2017 from PBS NewsHour

At Northern California’s Lake Oroville, water levels receded Monday, stopping the overflow of water from the dam’s emergency spillway. This reduced the risk of immediate uncontrolled flooding -- but longer-term concerns remain. William Brangham speaks with Jeffrey Mount of the Public Policy Institute of California about the massive evacuation that took place and the outlook for the dam's future.

Video

grandcanyon.ucdavis.edu

UC Davis in the Grand Canyon:
A Journey Through Time

September 2016 from UC Davis in the Grand Canyon

Learn how the Grand Canyon reflects global, not just Arizona, history with UC Davis geology professor Dave Osleger. Credit: Joe Proudman/UC Davis

Visit grandcanyon.ucdavis.edu for more stories, audio and video.

Audio

Grand Canyon

UC Davis in the Grand Canyon:
Professor Nicholas Pinter on Rafting Through the Grand Canyon

September 2016 from UC Davis in the Grand Canyon

Nicholas Pinter, UC Davis professor, discusses the significance of rafting down the Colorado River with graduate students, with UC Davis Strategic Communications Multimedia Specialist, Joe Proudman, who filmed and photographed the trip.

Visit grandcanyon.ucdavis.edu for more stories, audio and video.

Video

grandcanyon.ucdavis.edu

UC Davis in the Grand Canyon:
Science. Education. Discovery.

Published on Sep 14, 2016

Join UC Davis students and faculty on their journey of science, education and discovery down the Colorado River. 

Visit grandcanyon.ucdavis.edu for more stories, audio and video.

Audio

For Oysters, Challenges and Hope in the Changing Ocean

For Oysters, Challenges and Hope in the Changing Ocean

September 30, 2016 from Science Friday

Tessa Hill, an associate professor of earth and planetary sciences at UC-Davis’ Bodega Marine Lab, is working with farmers to find solutions for oysters and farmers alike and joins Ira to discuss her efforts in a live interview from the Mondavi Center at the University of California, Davis. From new hatcheries that can nourish oyster larvae in ideal water conditions, to the potential of seagrasses to pull carbon dioxide out of the water, she talks about what hope the future holds for oyster farmers and consumers.

Video

Dawn Sumner

Oxygen Oases in Lakes May Have Heralded the Great Oxidation Event

July 11, 2016 from USGS Pacific Region Colloquium, Menlo Park

Dawn Sumner discusses her most recent ideas on how we got O2 in the atmosphere.

Video

Sarah Stewart

The love of science fiction leads to a lifetime study of planetary evolution

November 10, 2015 from One of a Kind
Sarah Stewart Shockwave Scientist/Moon Maven/Science Fiction Fan Girl
"I've always had a fascination with science fiction. It's partly why I chose to study planetary sciences, along with a love of physics and a belief in the likelihood of life beyond our solar system. Sometimes, I feel like I'm starring in a science fiction film. I get to play explorer, researching how large bodies impact planets and result in the unexpected. There is a tremendous feeling of excitement when I discover something new.

Video

Tessa Hill

What Oysters Reveal About Sea Change

 July 21, 2015 from Mark Bittman: California Matters
New York food writer Mark Bittman braves the elements off the coast of California and learns how researchers are helping local and regional seafood producers monitor the effects of ocean acidification. Tessa Hill has been researching ocean acidification at Bodega Marine Laboratory for eight years. Read the New York Times article.

Audio

Sumner and Mars Curiosity Rover

Discoveries By Curiosity Rover On Mars

December 17, 2014 from Insight with Beth Ruyak, Capital Public Radio
Much like Frodo Baggins on his way to Mount Doom, NASA’s Curiosity rover is working its way towards the Martian Mount Sharp. It’s currently in the Gale Crater at the foot of the mountain, which may have once been a lake teeming with living organisms. Researchers say they discovered the first definitive detection of organics in surface materials of Mars. These organic molecules are the building blocks of life and suggest the Red Planet once supported life of some fashion. Dawn Sumner is a professor of geology at UC Davis who is on NASA’s Curiosity team.

Audio

Antarctica

Mission To Antarctica

October 6, 2014 from Insight with Beth Ruyak, Capital Public Radio
Why would geologists be studying bacteria at the bottom of a lake in Antarctica to better understand whether life once existed on other planets? Learning how microbial communities affect the shaping of bio-chemical structures called stromatolites could help researchers understand whether living bacteria was present in the formation of geological structures on Mars, where NASA scientists currently have access to sedimentary rocks.

AUDIO

Kari Cooper

Reservoirs of Magma

Video

John Rundle

UC Davis professor gives history, science behind Napa quake

August 24, 2014 from KCRA Channel 3 News
UC Davis professor John Rundle gives some history behind major earthquakes in the Bay Area and talks about the fault line where the Napa earthquake struck.

Video

Dawn Sumner

Ancient Earth, Alien Earths

August 20, 2014
Professor Dawn Sumner participated in an August 20 event at NASA headquarters, called Ancient Earth, Alien Earths. A panel of scientists from NASA and other organizations discussed how vastly different and inhospitable we all would find ancient Earth, if we could go back in time.

Video

John Rundle

Oklahoma now most seismically active state in the U.S.?

June 06, 2014 from Lou Dobbs Tonight, Fox Business Network
UC Davis physics and geology professor John Rundle on the growing number of earthquakes.

Video

Tyler Mackey

Life on the Ice

March 10, 2014
Visual journalist Karl Drury and journalist, Deidre Mussen, were invited by Antarctica New Zealand to spend two weeks in Antarctica from late November as part of its media programme. Their assignment included profiling people working on the ice to highlight the reality of life on the world's southernmost continent.

Tyler Mackey, UC Davis PhD student in geology, was interviewed.

Video Production and Photography: Karl Drury
Words: Deidre Mussen
Pixels: Andy Ball

Video

Kari Cooper

Volcanoes: What's Under Mount Hood?

February 16, 2014
A new study of Mount Hood, Ore., shows that the volcano's magma reservoir is in an eruptible state as little as 1 percent of the time. UC Davis geologist Kari Cooper says that if this is generally true for other volcanoes, it could lead to new ways to forecast when an eruption could occur.

Audio

Jeff Mount

Should Governor Brown Declare a Statewide Drought?

January 14, 2013 from KQED radio - Forum with Michael Krasny
Last year was the driest year on record in California -- and not much rainfall is expected in the near future. Leading lawmakers and farmers in the San Joaquin Valley are calling on Governor Jerry Brown to officially declare a drought, which would trigger conservation measures. Guests include Jeff Mount.

Audio

Dawn Sumner

Mars Curiosity Update

September 27, 2013 From Capital Public Radio
Dawn Sumner, who is a co-investigator for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory team, talks about the significance of finding methane on Mars and some recent Curiosity discoveries. 

Video

Amy Williams

Amy Williams at TEDxUCDavis

June 23, 2013
Exploring the cosmos has always been a dream of Amy's. With the natural world as a source of great inspiration, she has become interested in geobiology - the interactions between microbial life and the environment. She has worked on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover mission, and has found new and innovative ways to search for clues of martian life. She now spends much of her time on her Ph.D. research in geobiology, studying the physical traces that microbial life leaves behind in rocks.

Video

Oliver Kreylos

Augmented Reality Sandbox

June 17, 2013
An interview with research computer scientist Oliver Kreylos at the 2013 Augmented World Expo. This was the first time the prototype of the augmented reality sandbox, developed by the UC Davis KeckCaves, was shown outside of UC Davis.

Video

Howard Spero

Our Changing Seas:
Voyage to an Earth that No One Has Seen Before

May 9, 2013
Dr. Howard Spero is the Director of the Stable Isotope in the Earth and Planetary Sciences Department at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Spero speaks about his research examining the shells of marine fossils in the ocean sediment to reconstruct the history of Earth's past climates and ocean circulation changes. Dr. Spero presents the mounting evidence that our current potentially catastrophic global climate changes are due to human activity.

Audio

Jeff Mount

Aboard the Tugnacious With Dr. Doom

March 1, 2013 from KQED Science
Two-thirds of California residents rely on water pumped through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, as its delicate ecosystem teeters on the brink, and its aging levees crumble. An interview with Jeff Mount.

Video

Dawn Sumner

Reaching out, beyond Earth

March 8, 2013
UC Davis Earth and Planetary Sciences professor Dawn Sumner uses virtual reality 3-D images to walk around the surface of Earth and Mars. This new technology enables the study rocks, particularly the much older ones on the Mars, which can offer clues to the origins of the red planet and our own planet.

Audio

Dawn Sumner

Mars Rover Will Have UC Davis Professor at Controls

August 2, 2012 from Capital Public Radio
The NASA rover called Curiosity is scheduled to land on Mars on Sunday. Once it does, Dawn Sumner will be one of its navigators.

Blogs

Adventures on the JOIDES Resolution

July 2015 - Masters student Millie Levin is blogging about her experiences on a scientific expedition off the coast of Australia. For the next two months, as part of her M.S. research, she will be on the JOIDES Resolution, a 143-meter long research vessel that drills sediment cores for the International Ocean Drilling Program.

The Trembling Earth

from the AGU blogosphere 
Austin Elliott is a recent Ph.D. graduate from the University of California Davis. He researches the history of earthquakes in the landscape and how fault geometry modulates their occurrence. In this blog he highlights developments in earthquake science, notable mitigation efforts around the world, and media that unveil and illuminate the phenomenon of earthquakes.