Mike Oskin standing alongside a fence railing where tibetan prayer flags have been tied. In the background are mountains.

Mike Oskin at a mountain pass near the town of Jiulong (nine dragons), Sichuan Province, May 2012. Anomalously high exhumation rates in this part of the southeast Tibetan Plateau may be driven by glacial erosion.

Michael E. Oskin

Professor
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology (2002)
Structural Geology and Tectonics 

Structural geology and geomorphology of active orogens applied to understanding tectonic processes and geodynamics. Integration of surface processes and tectonics to predict the origin and evolution of topography, with emphasis on arid regions. Current research foci include time-dependent fault system behavior in southern California, orogenic growth and basin evolution in the Tian Shan, continental rupture in the Gulf of California extensional province, and transient landscape evolution in central Asia and southwestern North America.

meoskin@ucdavis.edu
(530) 752-3993

http://mygeologypage.ucdavis.edu/oskin
Oskin publications: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=29Ba1c0AAAAJ


Recent Publications

Gold, PO, ME Oskin, AJ Elliott, A Hinojosa-Corona, MH Taylor, O Kreylos, ES Cowgill (2013) Coseismic slip variation assessed from terrestrial lidar scans of the El Mayor-Cucapah surface rupture. EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS. 366(3013):151-162. DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2013.01.040

Selander, J, ME Oskin, C Ormukov and K Abdrakhmatov (2012) Inherited strike-slip faults as an origin for basement-cored uplifts: Example of the Kungey and Zailiskey ranges, northern Tian Shan. TECTONICS. 31(4) DOI: 10.1029/2011TC003002

Blisniuk, K, ME Oskin, K Fletcher, T Rockwell and W Sharp (2012) Assessing the reliability of U-series and 10Be dating techniques on alluvial fans in the Anza Borrego Desert, California. QUATERNARY GEOCHRONOLOGY. 13:26-41. DOI: 10.1016/j.quageo.2012.08.004

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